In the Media

Recent Media Features

 

 

Firesmart Canada, April 25: Improve The Wildfire Resilience of Construction, Renovation, and Landscape Projects with User-Friendly Checklist 

A new, user-friendly wildfire resilience checklist is available from FireSmart™ Canada to help you integrate simple wildfire resilient design principles and ignition-resistant materials into your construction, renovation, and landscaping projects.

Many of the checklist’s wildfire-resilient upgrades can be delivered at low to no additional cost.

The boost to your professional reputation and the added peace of mind for your clients, however, is priceless.

Man pours water over his head in street during heat waveCBC News, April 22: Canadians need to do more to prep for ‘potentially lethal’ extreme heat events: report

Researchers from the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation at the University of Waterloo in Ontario consulted 60 experts across the country for the report, which includes “practical actions” individuals and communities can take to address rising temperatures.

Extreme heat is when the temperature and humidity rise above what is considered normal for an area. In some cases, the researchers say, it can be deadly.

Global News, April 20: Extreme heat should be labelled a natural disaster, Canadian report urges

Irreversible Extreme Heat, penned by experts at the Intact Centre on Climate Change at the University of Waterloo, says “Canadian alarm bells should be ringing” about the risk of intense heat.

“Extreme heat is kind of a disaster waiting to happen,” said lead author Joanna Eyquem, managing director of climate-resilient infrastructure at the Intact Centre.

Global Newswire, April 20: The Ultimate Code Red: Preparing Canada for Extreme Heat

“Warming and more intense extreme heat will be present for decades to come,” said study co-author Joanna Eyquem, managing director of Climate Resilient Infrastructure. “If an extreme-heat event coincided with an extended electricity outage — with no fans or air conditioning running — loss of life could easily jump to the thousands.”

 

The Energy Mix, April 20: ‘Loud and Clear’ Alarm Bells Over Extreme Heat in New Climate Adaptation Report

Annual loss of life could “surpass the 595 heat-related fatalities reported by British Columbia’s coroner in 2021, and 86 lives lost in Quebec in 2018,” if policy-makers and the public fail to address the problem, says an Intact Centre press release. These fatalities will be predominantly amongst the elderly, the poor, the disabled, and the homeless, according to the report.

 

Toronto Star, April 19: This ‘silent killer’ of climate change may hit 17 million Canadians the hardest. Here’s what a new report suggests as protection

It’s floods that lead to repairs costing billions of dollars. It’s fires that burn images of charred buildings and communities into our minds.

But of all the extreme weather events made more likely by climate change, it’s another — extreme heat — that is the deadliest. And a new report by Canadian experts on climate adaptation says there are clear ways to make sure fewer Canadians die of extreme heat in the future.

 

Ottawa Citizen, March 22, 2022: Beware the flood factor: Considerations for homebuyers looking near the Ottawa River

A report from the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation at the University of Waterloo, published in February, examined the impact of catastrophic flooding on the sale price of homes in a handful of locations in Canada, including the Ottawa and Gatineau area. Looking at the sixth months pre- and post-flooding in affected parts of Constance Bay, Fitzroy Harbour, Clarence-Rockland, Arnprior, Kanata and Bayshore, there was nine per cent and 10 per cent hit to the average sold price of a home in 2017 and 2019, compared to control non-flooded communities.

 

Ottawa Citizen, March 22, 2022: Ottawa’s first-time homebuyers’ guide

And the nightmare doesn’t end when the water recedes.

A report from the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation at the University of Waterloo, published in February, examined the impact of catastrophic flooding on the sale price of homes in a handful of locations in Canada, including the Ottawa and Gatineau area. Looking at the sixth months pre- and post-flooding in affected parts of Constance Bay, Fitzroy Harbour, Clarence-Rockland, Arnprior, Kanata and Bayshore, there was nine per cent and 10 per cent hit to the average sold price of a home in 2017 and 2019, compared to control non-flooded communities.
 

Financial Post, March 9, 2022: The adaptation gap: While money pours into emissions reduction, it’s proving harder to find the billions needed to get ready for a changing climate
“The Intact Centre is seeking to lay some of the groundwork. A recent project drew on real estate records to put numbers on the effects of a recent flood on a community’s property values. Comparing similar neighbourhoods, Feltmate said, it found a flood depressed prices by 8.2 per cent, reduced listings by 44.3 per cent and meant properties stayed unsold 19.8 per cent longer.”

 

Financial Post, February 15, 2022: Homes sell for 8.2 per cent less after catastrophic floods
 “For most homeowners, their house is their biggest financial investment. As this report clearly shows, an all-of-society effort to protect that investment from the growing threat of flooding would be of great benefit to many Canadians.”Study co-author Dr. Blair Feltmate said, “Canada must learn to manage flood risk, rather than chase it. Recognizing that residential flooding is the most costly and pervasive impact of extreme weather, municipal planners should double-down on ensuring that adaptation factors into community design.”

Last Updated: May 3, 2022 @3:15 PM