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Ice BergCTV News, January 23, 2022: Canadian scientist examines melting Antarctic glacier, potential sea level rise
In a telephone interview last week, Joughin said planning coastal protection and other measures for the more extreme scenarios may not be cost effective at this point, as it may take up to a century before the major risks starts to unfold.However, Joanna Eyquem, a Montreal-based geoscientist who is studying ways to prepare infrastructure for rising sea levels, said in a recent email that glacier research shows sea level forecasts “are constantly evolving,” and adaptation efforts need to be quicker.

“The question is: How desperate does the situation need to be before we take action?” she asked.

SAB Magazine, December 30, 2021: Using Nature-based Solutions to Enhance Coastal Protection
“Coastal flooding and erosion are a direct threat to the health and safety of people living in coastal communities, and cause damage to local infrastructure and property. The majority of Canada’s coastal population is located along the East (Atlantic) and West (Pacific) coastlines, where sea levels are rising due to irreversible climate change.Action is required NOW to manage the growing risks to coastal communities. A recent report from the University of Waterloo’s Intact Centre describes how Canada can scale-up the use of nature-based solutions, in tandem with ‘grey’ infrastructure, to protect communities along the East and West coastlines.”
 

CBC, December 29, 2021: From tree maintenance to simple hardware store upgrades, here’s what you can do to prepare for climate change

“Cheryl Evans, director of flood and wildfire resilience at the University of Waterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, said “every location in the country has slightly different risks that are present now and that will continue to increase.”

Residents should regularly inspect trees around their properties and do preventive maintenance, like pruning, when needed.

“As the winters warm, we’re gonna get a lot more freezing rain as opposed to snow, so we’re gonna see a lot more burden on trees — so check how close the trees are to your hydro lines.”

 

CBC, December 26, 2021: Canada wasn’t prepared for natural disasters in 2021 — and next year threatens a repeat

“In 2018, the federal government created a disaster mitigation and adaptation fund, now backed by $3.375 billion. Christian said federal money to pay for major projects has not yet arrived in his city.”

“Coastal communities also need more protection. A report released this month by the Intact Centre on Climate Adaption at the University of Waterloo found that Canada lacks a national system to assess risk in coastal areas.”

“The report called on the federal government to fund more natural infrastructure projects — such as stabilizing cliffs and restoring wetlands — to protect communities from rising sea levels.”

Business in Vancouver, December 21, 2021: Only a team effort can stave off the next B.C. flood disaster: mayor
“Joanna Eyquem, managing director of Climate-Resilient Infrastructure at the University of Waterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, said a national strategy is needed to deal with coastal flooding.””A report she co-authored, Rising Seas and Shifting Sands, talks about strategies, which can include “holding the line” or retreating. In the case of the flooding in Gatineau, Quebec, in 2017 and 2019, the Quebec government has opted to do some retreating.”“There are areas where we’re not building back,” Eyquem said. “And Quebec has limited the amount of assistance people can get for a particular house, and once that money is gone there’s no more assistance to try to encourage the move from these very vulnerable areas.”
Business in Vancouver, December 21, 2021: Disaster prompts rethink of long-term road and bridge planning

“There are things that can be done to harden roads and bridges against flooding, said Joanna Eyquem, managing director of climate-resilient infrastructure at the University of Waterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation.”

“One thing we’ve often done in Canada is we’ve sized our bridges and pinch-points at rivers too small.”

“Eyquem added that hardening highway and bridge infrastructure could include increasing the width of culverts and bridges.”

Toronto Star, December 12, 2021: As seas rise, study sees need for national, natural approach to help coastal towns 

“A study released this weekend by the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, based at Ontario’s University of Waterloo, found Canada lacks a national planning system or standard classifications compared to other countries. Such systems can be used to evaluate risks to coastal areas and plot the wisest path forward.”

“The key conclusions of the 94-page report, called “Rising Seas and Shifting Sands,” call for the federal government to develop national standards, particularly for natural solutions that range from dune restoration to re-establishment of marshlands.”

“perhaps the greatest challenge in Canada … is a limited sense of urgency to act,” the report concludes.”

properties flooded at Everglades-Resort on Hatzic Lake in BCGlobal Newswire, December 9, 2021: Protect or Retreat: Rising Seas Threaten Canada’s Atlantic and Pacific Coasts

“As witnessed in recent weeks, rising seas, swollen atmospheric rivers and post-tropical storms are a threat to community infrastructure, housing and the safety of those living along Canada’s east and west coasts. In response, new guidance from the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, University of Waterloo, presents practical solutions to limit the financial and social costs of these evolving risks.”

“The majority of Canada’s coastal population lives directly on the Atlantic (east) and Pacific (west) coastlines, where rising sea levels, storm surges, and high tides can act together to cause flooding, with damaging impacts on communities and infrastructure. The need to rapidly combat these threats is underscored in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Sixth Assessment Report, which highlights that sea-level rise is locked-in “for centuries to millennia to come.”

Man-made sea well along cabot trail in Nova ScotiaCanadian Underwriter, December 9, 2021: Diverse coastal protections can help limit storm risk

“Both constructed solutions like dykes and seawalls and greener approaches like saltmarsh restoration and dune replenishment can help combat financial and social costs that result from severe storms, a new report noted.”

“Rising seas, swollen atmospheric rivers and post-tropical storms are a threat to community infrastructure, housing and the safety of those living along Canada’s east and west coasts,” said Rising Seas and Shifting Sands, released Dec. 9 by the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation and University of Waterloo.”

“We can no longer manage coastal risks by endlessly fighting against natural processes,” said report author, Joanna Eyquem, managing director of climate-resilient infrastructure at Intact Centre. “There are real win-win opportunities to work with nature in the long term, with multiple benefits for the community and beyond.”

properties flooded at Everglades-Resort on Hatzic Lake in BCCTV News, December 9, 2021: Rising seas are threatening Canada’s Atlantic and Pacific coasts: report

“Heavy rainfall and the resultant flooding in British Columbia and the East Coast have caused serious damage in recent weeks, but a new report suggests rising sea levels due to climate change pose a much greater flood risk for Canadians — and little has been done to mitigate it.”

“The report, published on Thursday, found that nearly 4.8 million Canadians live within 10 kilometres of the eastern or western coastline, and are thus “likely to be greatly affected” by climate-change-induced flooding, either through rising sea levels, extreme weather events or changing tides.”

 

 

Last Updated: January 7, 2022 @4:00PM

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